Dec 12

This episode of Your Right to Speak is a press conference recording that took place on November 29, 2018 organized by the Ontario Children’s Advocacy Coalition. The press conference was in response to a recent decision by the Provincial Government. Below is a press release from the Ontario Children’s Advocacy Coalition regarding the Government’s Decision:

“On November 15, 2018, the Ontario Government announced its intention to discontinue the Ontario Child Advocate’s Office (OCA; formerly known as Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth). This Office ensures young people have a voice about things that affect their lives. This decision is especially devastating for young people living on the margins, Black youth, Indigenous youth, young people living in the care of public institutions like child welfare or youth justice and those with special challenges or disabilities.

The current Ontario government has said that they will transfer some of the functions of the Office of the Child Advocate to the Ombudsman of Ontario, a much larger office that deals with consumer complaints by adults in a wide range of public services, but that has no experience dealing with child welfare, child and youth mental health and youth justice sectors. Young people involved in those sectors are unfamiliar with the Ombudsman, and there are no opportunities for a collective voice. The Child Advocates Office would be subsumed under an institution that deals solely with adults. An independent Office must be maintained to ensure the appropriate support and care of Ontario’s most vulnerable children and youth.

Presently, the Provincial Child Advocate was chosen and appointed by an all-party Committee of the legislature and he reports directly to the legislature through the speaker. This is to ensure that his Office remains independent and is not unduly influenced by the government or at risk of reprisals for releasing reports to the public that are critical of the government’s performance, particularly as it relates to children in its care. Bill 57 introduced by the Progressive Conservative Government would cut three legislative officers which includes the Ontario Child Advocate. Disrupting the independence and authority of the Child Advocate who represents the most vulnerable children and youth in the province without thoughtful consideration of the facts or thorough public consultation demonstrates an unconscionable breach of power.”

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Nov 28

This is part 2 of our is a panel conversation with Tanitia Munroe, Karlene Williams-Clark, Dr. Lance McCready, Elise Yusef and Cannary Branco regarding the research project Understanding Non-Financial Barriers to Black Queer Youth Transitions from High School to College. The primary goal of the project was to build an evidence base to guide the work of postsecondary education connectors working with organizations that serve Black queer youth. The guests are a mixture of researchers, community partners, and people interviewed for the research project.

Due to the number of people we went longer than usual with this episode. Rather than playing the whole 1 hour at once, we split the conversation into two episodes, you can listen to part 1 by going to the October 31 2018 episode of CYC podcast.

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Oct 31

This episode is a panel conversation with 5 people, Tanitia Munroe, Karlene Williams-Clark, Dr. Lance McCready, Elise Yusef and Cannary Branco. The conversation is about a recent research project called Understanding Non-Financial Barriers to Black Queer Youth Transitions from High School to College. The primary goal of the project was to build an evidence base to guide the work of postsecondary education connectors working with organizations that serve Black queer youth. The guests are a mixture of researchers, community partners, and people interviewed for the research project.

Due to the number of people we went longer than usual with this episode. Rather than playing the whole 1 hour at once, we are splitting the conversation into two episodes, one this month and the second one the last Wednesday of November.

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Oct 10

On this episode of Your Right to Speak I talked with Catherine Ellis-Dobson who is the Assistant Director at Arrabon House. Catherine talks about some of the gaps in the group home/ residential care system and what needs to be changed. The conversation then turns to how to Child and Youth workers know the residential program is benefiting the youth and how success looks like. Near the end of the episode, Catherin offers advice for new students entering the residential setting. Let's raise awareness together! 

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Apr 11

On this episode of Your Right to Speak, I talk with Melanie who is a Masters of Social Work student at York University. Melanie has been focusing her research on mental health in post-secondary education. The conversation starts off with Melanie explaining why it is essential to have a discussion on the topic of mental health in post-secondary settings. The conversation then turns to what Melanie has found in her research and some of the gaps in services offered in the post-secondary environment to assist youth, relating to mental health.   

Let's raise awareness together!

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Jan 10

On this episode of Your Right to Speak, Sammy speaks with Smyrna, a team member of Yantics which is an onling outlet for youth networking. Smyrna gives some examples on how adults can sometimes discrimination against young people and explains the sometimes it is not attentional. The conversation then turns to the importance of adult youth partnership, the benefits of mentorship and how both young people and adults can learn from each other.

 

For more information on Yantics please see below

Yantics.com is a by youth, for youth website developed for youth to network, connect, promote themselves, find help and assistance, be entertained, shop and share their ideas all in one spot.

Website: www.Yantics.com

Instagram: www.instagram.com/yanticsdotcom

Twitter: www.twitter.com/yanticsdotcom

Tumblr: yantics.tumblr.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiJ_rn9HdBOokSas_oMgFOg   

Facebook page: Yantics Youth

Let’s raise awareness together!

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Dec 27

In this interview, Maria Lotty discusses six principles of trauma-informed care, and how to integrate these principles when working with children and youth, particularly in the context of foster parenting. Maria is a practicing Fostering Social Worker and PhD student at the University College Cork (UCC), in Ireland. Maria has a background in youth work, residential social work and child protection. She is currently undertaking a research collaboration between UCC and Tulsa- Family and Child Agency involving the design, development and evaluation of Fostering Connections, a Trauma-informed Foster Care Program.

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Nov 08

On this episode of Your Right to Speak, Salvatore talks with Elena Gordon who is the Youth Justice Case Lead at For Youth Initiative. Elena talks about the gaps within the youth justice sector and the need for change in the sector. Elena stresses in the conversation there needs to be more education offered to young people regarding youth justice. The discussion then turns to the pros and cons of utilizing restorative justice.  For more information For Youth Initiative, please visit http://www.foryouth.ca/

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Sep 27

In this conversation with Dr. Julie Repper, we talk about people with “lived experience” working in the mental health system, Recovery Colleges, peer support workers, and what impact sharing one’s own experiences can have.

Dr. Repper is the director of Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change (ImROC), an organization based in Nottinghamshire, UK. She is a nurse, a manager, a researcher and lecturer focusing in particular on mental health services, and Recovery approaches.

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Sep 13

On this episode, we are talking about disability and practice with Shay Erlich. who has just completed her Masters in Child and Youth Care at Ryerson University. Shay talks about some of the gaps and challenges faced by young people with disabilities and the unique culture within the deaf community.  Shay discusses the need for CYCs to take into consideration accessibility needs of individuals and the importance of including young people’s voices in the conversation around their accommodations.  Shay also talks about how a CYC practitioner, who themselves has a disability, can impact the relationship between the young person and the practitioner.

 

Let’s raise awareness together!

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Aug 23

This episode is an audio recording of the opening keynote presentation at the Ontario Association of Child and Youth Care 2017 conference. The keynote was delivered by Heather Snell, Shadan Hyder, Cory Mackinlay, and Paul Kitz, and it was choreographed by Coleen Snell. The actual keynote, as you might guess from the inclusion of a choreographer, was not the usual keynote fare. An audio recording does not accurately represent the keynote as presented. Along with Heather, three students shared some of their own experiences related to being in Child and Youth Care. Accompanying each student was a dancer. Thus, there was a highly visual aspect to the key note, which is not adequately captured in the audio recording. However, after discussions with Heather and the students, we decided to post the audio because it still raises many important points for consideration, particularly to those who teach in Child and Youth Care.

Heather and company will be reprising this Keynote at the 2018 World CYC conference happening in Ventura, California this coming January, visit (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nurturing-hope-2018-tickets-33509164814) for more information.
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Aug 09

On this episode of Your Right to Speak we talk with Ian Green who is a professor at York University's Master of Public Policy, Administration, and Law. Ian talks about ethical politics and its relation to young people. In the first part of the episode Ian discusses the challenges and strengths of ethical politics, in the second he argues that policy makers should have training in anti-oppression to better address some of the stigmas people bring with them when developing policy.  Ian also mentions how young people can be better engage in politics.

Let’s raise awareness together!

If you are a child or youth that would like to be on the show or have a topic that you think we should discuss, please email Salvatore and Jenn at yourrighttospeak@gmail.com   

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Jul 19

We are continuing our uploading of presentations from the Ontario Association of Child and Youth Care conference which took place in June 2017. Today’s episode is called Walking the Path Towards Meaningful Youth Engagement. The presentation is by two young people who lived in residential care and three Ryerson University Master’s in Child and Youth Care Students.

 

The following is the conference abstract:

 

Walking the Path Towards Meaningful Youth Engagement

Since the ratification of the UNCRC, the participation and voice of young people has become a focus in child and youth serving organizations. Progress has been made, however young people still find themselves silenced, dismissed, and removed from the conversations and decisions impacting their lives. Current initiatives for youth engagement are often limited through tokenistic and outdated approaches, that result in young people continuing to feel as though they are not heard and do not have control over their own lives. We as CYCs need to model and advocate for the advancement of meaningful and authentic youth engagement. In order to do this, we need to unpack the complexities and barriers so we can envision a way forward. This presentation will focus on the role of CYC practitioners to support and partner with young people to elevate their voices and participation in the care and services they receive. Through a reflective process, we will examine the barriers that inhibit us from fully implementing a youth engagement approach in our daily practice. CYCs have the responsibility to navigate through these barriers.

 

Camille Bautista is a current high school student and Ryerson bound hopeful with a particular passion concerning the complexities surrounding philosophical conundrums. She aspires to become a lawyer in the hopes of lending her voice and determination to advocate for the rights of either the environment’s protection or refugee crises.

 

Charles Jackson is a current student of Fleming College in the Academic Upgrading program, who will be attending Fleming in the fall for the Personal Support Worker Program. Charles hopes to work with the disabled and elderly community, in order to help them remember their humanity and special place in our society.

 

Joe Blake, BA CYC is currently enrolled in the MA CYC program and has been working in the field of CYC for seven years. Joe’s interests in the field particularly lie in the areas of the youth justice system, restorative practices, social justice, Indigenous practices and youth advocacy.

 

Amanda Mayhew, BA CYC, MA CYC candidate, is a dynamic CYC practitioner who has been in the field for 8 years. Her expertise is in residential care, where she has been a leader in relational and strength-based approaches. Amanda is well versed in the research on children’s rights and youth engagement. Her passion is advocating for young people to be included in all decisions that impact their lives.

 

Christopher Tone, BA CYC, MA CYC candidate, has practiced in the CYC field in varying capacities for approximately twelve years. The bulk of his experience lies in school based and residential care for young people who have been dually diagnosed and/or have ASD. Christopher is keenly interested in exploring issues surrounding street involved youth, and the application of children’s rights in Canada and in international contexts

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Jun 28

In early June 2017, the Ontario Association of Child and Youth Care had their conference in Toronto. Over the course of the summer we will be uploading several different presentations and talks from this conference.

We are starting with presentations from Educators Day, which happened the day before the regular conference. Rather than having teachers speaking to teachers, this year we had students and system-involved young people present to educators. We called the day, Learning from the Educated. These two short presentations are Sunbal and Aisha Mohammad. They spoke about being Muslim students, their decision to start wearing a hijab while in the program, and facing white privilege as religious and racialized students.

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Jun 21

In early June 2017, the Ontario Association of Child and Youth Care had their conference in Toronto. Over the course of the summer we will be uploading several different presentations and talks from this conference.

We are starting with presentations from Educators Day, which happened the day before the regular conference. Rather than having teachers speaking to teachers, this year we had students and system-involved young people present to educators. We called the day, Learning from the Educated. This presentation is from Shyanne Nichols. Shyanne spoke about being a student who started her degree in Child and Youth Care while in the child welfare system, and her experiences transitioning out of care while in the program.

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