Jul 26

In early June 2017, the Ontario Association of Child and Youth Care had their conference in Toronto. Over the course of the summer we will be uploading several different presentations and talks from this conference.

This is the last presentation from Educators Day, which happened the day before the regular conference. Rather than having teachers speaking to teachers, this year we had students and system-involved young people present to educators. We called the day, Learning from the Educated. This presentation by Tanitia Munroe speaks to issues of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, with a particular focus on Black students in post-secondary schooling in Canada.

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Jul 19

We are continuing our uploading of presentations from the Ontario Association of Child and Youth Care conference which took place in June 2017. Today’s episode is called Walking the Path Towards Meaningful Youth Engagement. The presentation is by two young people who lived in residential care and three Ryerson University Master’s in Child and Youth Care Students.

 

The following is the conference abstract:

 

Walking the Path Towards Meaningful Youth Engagement

Since the ratification of the UNCRC, the participation and voice of young people has become a focus in child and youth serving organizations. Progress has been made, however young people still find themselves silenced, dismissed, and removed from the conversations and decisions impacting their lives. Current initiatives for youth engagement are often limited through tokenistic and outdated approaches, that result in young people continuing to feel as though they are not heard and do not have control over their own lives. We as CYCs need to model and advocate for the advancement of meaningful and authentic youth engagement. In order to do this, we need to unpack the complexities and barriers so we can envision a way forward. This presentation will focus on the role of CYC practitioners to support and partner with young people to elevate their voices and participation in the care and services they receive. Through a reflective process, we will examine the barriers that inhibit us from fully implementing a youth engagement approach in our daily practice. CYCs have the responsibility to navigate through these barriers.

 

Camille Bautista is a current high school student and Ryerson bound hopeful with a particular passion concerning the complexities surrounding philosophical conundrums. She aspires to become a lawyer in the hopes of lending her voice and determination to advocate for the rights of either the environment’s protection or refugee crises.

 

Charles Jackson is a current student of Fleming College in the Academic Upgrading program, who will be attending Fleming in the fall for the Personal Support Worker Program. Charles hopes to work with the disabled and elderly community, in order to help them remember their humanity and special place in our society.

 

Joe Blake, BA CYC is currently enrolled in the MA CYC program and has been working in the field of CYC for seven years. Joe’s interests in the field particularly lie in the areas of the youth justice system, restorative practices, social justice, Indigenous practices and youth advocacy.

 

Amanda Mayhew, BA CYC, MA CYC candidate, is a dynamic CYC practitioner who has been in the field for 8 years. Her expertise is in residential care, where she has been a leader in relational and strength-based approaches. Amanda is well versed in the research on children’s rights and youth engagement. Her passion is advocating for young people to be included in all decisions that impact their lives.

 

Christopher Tone, BA CYC, MA CYC candidate, has practiced in the CYC field in varying capacities for approximately twelve years. The bulk of his experience lies in school based and residential care for young people who have been dually diagnosed and/or have ASD. Christopher is keenly interested in exploring issues surrounding street involved youth, and the application of children’s rights in Canada and in international contexts

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Jun 14
On this episode of your Right to Speak we talk with Child and Youth Counsellor Ian Pereira on the topic of Anti-Oppression. Ian talks about how important it is for people who are developing policy and programs to work through an anti-oppression framework because it recognizes the power and privileges that exist, and allows for more equity. Ian stresses how important it is for individuals who come from privilege and power to feel uncomfortable, reflect, and listen to the lived experiences of various community members.
 
 
Let's raise awareness together.
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May 31

Sandra Davis is a foster parent whose been loving, caring for, and supporting young women for over 15 years. In this conversation, Sandra discusses the joys and challenges of foster care, where she sees it going in the future, and provides some thoughts for those considering becoming a foster parent.

 

Thank you for listening to our 100th episode! Please feel free to LIKE us on Facebook @ www.facebook.com/CYCPodcast, and subscribe to us on iTunes and Stitcher! 

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May 12
On this episode on your Right to Speak, we continue on the topic of mental health. We talk with Paul Pereira who works in a day treatment substance abuse program for youth. Paul identifies some of the service gaps for young people with mental health challenges; such as, not enough CYCPs in the field and the importance of having services that follow throughout the young person’s life. At the end of the conversation he offers advice to new & future CYCPs, and talks about the most important thing he has learned. 
 
If you are a child or youth that would like to be on the show or have a topic that you think we should discuss, please email Salvatore and Jenn at yourrighttospeak@gmail.com   
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Mar 29

Amanda Riley, a recent Bachelor of Child and Youth Care graduate from MacEwan University in Edmonton, Alberta discusses her research looking at the impact of school bus riding for young students in New Zealand/ Aotearoa. Academic achievement, driver/student relationships, bus safety, the impact of two hour commutes, and the possible role of CYCs are discussed.

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Mar 08

On this episode of Your Right to Speak, we end our Immigration and Refugees series with Pierre-Andre, a law student from York University. Pierre-Andre explains what the Refugee Sponsorship Support Program is and the importance of it. There is then a conversation of what the difference is between private sponsored and government-assisted refugees, as well as some of the challenges with the private sponsorship program. Let’s raise awareness together!

If you are a child or youth that would like to be on the show or  have a topic that you think we should discuss, please email Salvatore and Jenn at yourrighttospeak@gmail.com   

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Feb 08
In this episode Dr. Dagmar Soennecken discusses what defines a refugee, the process to become “a refugee” and talks about refugee children and trauma. Dr. Soennecken is an Associate Professor at York University, her research focuses on law, citizenship and migration.
 
 
If you are a child or youth that would like to be on the show or if you have a topic that you think we should talk about, please email Salvatore and Jenn at yourrighttospeak@gmail.com
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Jan 11
On this episode of Your Right to Speak. Salvatore talks with his colleague Shireen about the Israel and Palestine conflict. The conversation starts with a background of the issues related to the conflict and why they are so difficult to resolve. Near the end of this episode, Shireen talks about working with young people who have left this region and come to Canada.  
 
If you are a child or youth that would like to be on the show or if you have a topic that you think we should talk about, please email Salvatore at yourrighttospeak@gmail.com

 
Let's raise awareness together!
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Dec 28
In the second part of this two-part interview (part 1 posted November 30, 2016 & part 2 posted December 28, 2016) Dr Thom Garfat discusses the founding of CYC-Net.org, the journal Relational Child Youth Care Practices, and honouring elders in Child and Youth Care.
 
Dr. Thom Garfat is an author, an editor, a teacher, a mentor, and a practitioner that has been contributing to CYC for about five decades. For more information about Dr. Garfat visit http://www.cyc-net.org/People/people-garfat.htmland 
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Dec 14
On this episode, Salvatore and Jenn wrap up the year and reflect on past episodes. Each discuss what they’ve learned so far and what they hope for the future. Salvatore and Jenn also get a chance to talk about what advocacy means to them and that gaps they have seen in various systems. Let’s Raise Awareness together! 
 
If you are a child or youth that would like to be on the show or if you have a topic that you think we should talk about, please email Salvatore at yourrighttospeak@gmail.com 
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Nov 30
In part one of this two part interview (part 1 posted November 30, 2016 & part 2 posted December 28, 2016), Dr Thom Garfat tells engaging, fun, and insight filled stories about what brought him into Child and Youth Care (CYC), the early days of residential CYC in Canada, some of the important pioneers of the field, and his thoughts on what “relational practice” means. Through Thom’s friendly approach and accessible wisdom, a deep knowledge about working with children, youth and families is shared.
 
Dr. Thom Garfat is an author, an editor, a teacher, a mentor, and a practitioner that has been contributing to CYC for about five decades. For more information about Dr. Garfat visit http://www.cyc-net.org/People/people-garfat.htmland 
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Nov 09

On this episode of Your Right to Speak Salvatore and Jenn continue on the topic of sexual abuse. The guest Stewart is a volunteer at an agency called The Gatehouse. Stewart  talks about his experience as being  sexual abuse as a child and the peer support program that is offered at The Gatehouse that are free. The focus is that people are coming into The Gatehouse to heal. There is talk about the unique atmosphere create in The Gatehouse. For example how a child and adult is given a teddy bear when they come into The Gatehouse. There is also talk how there needs to be more services for man who are sexually abused. Stewart talks about the stigma of how people who are sexually abuse are often thought of as being sexual offenders.

If you are a child or youth that would like to be on the show or if you have a topic that you think we should talk about please email Salvatore at yourrighttospeak@gmail.com

To hear Stewart radio show please go to: 

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/personaltransformation  

The Gatehouse website: http://thegatehouse.org/

The Gatehouse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheGatehouseChildAbuseInvestigationSupportSite/?__mref=message_bubble

The Gatehouse Twitter: https://www.facebook.com/TheGatehouseChildAbuseInvestigationSupportSite/?__mref=message_bubble

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Oct 26
Stephen Ucembe starts the conversation by discussing his life growing up in residential care, which leads to an insightful, and at times disquieting, critique of institutional care in Kenya. The interview was inspired by Mr. Ucembe’s chapter in RESIDENTIAL CHILD AND YOUTH CARE IN A DEVELOPING WORLD: Global Perspectives (available from CYC-Net.org). His contribution is an engaging and eye-opening analysis of residential care in Kenya.

Stephen Ucembe founded the Kenya Society of Careleavers in 2009 to provide support to young people leaving institutional care. He is a social worker, and is employed by Hope and Homes for Children as a Regional Advocacy Manager.
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Aug 31

This week is a recording of the closing key note talk from the 2016 Canadian National Child and Youth Care conference, which took place in Halifax. In May of this year there was a report released called Because Young People Matter: Report of the Residential Services Review Panel. It is well worth reading, you can find a link to it here. Kiaras Gharabaghi is one of the three authors and in this talk he shares some of his learning and reflections from the report. The presentation is one hour long. Here is the description of his closing keynote:

“How is it that once the evidence has failed, the treatment is a bust, and the systems scratch their heads we look to CYCs to take over? Over the past ten years, professional structures, policy moves and institutional responses to young people facing adversity have prioritized rhetorical movements over relational practices. From family-based care to evidence-based treatment approaches, anything but child and youth care practice has de facto carried the day, until the system’s failures become sufficiently apparent that there is only one move left; the move of last resort – the move into places where child and youth care practitioners are asked to work miracles, but expected to accomplish little. The time to resist this trend is now. Gharabaghi argues that unless we elevate our approaches to stand as alternatives to the current rhetorical front runners, our profession will become known as the profession of last resort. Much is at stake.”

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